As a yoga teacher, you are continuously planning your next class, trying to come up with creative and meaningful sequences that will carry your message. The more classes you teach, the more difficult it may seem to become inspired. In case you’re stuck in a rut or feel a bit lost, we have some inspiration. Sequence your yoga classes in one or two of the following ways and over time, you’ll be able to deliver classes that’ll only get better.

1. A good yoga sequence includes a lot of poses that focus on everything; strength, flexibility and balance. When you maintain a basic template for your classes, it is easy to change the exercises between every session. Be sure to include an opening, warm-ups, standing poses, inversions, backbends, twists, forward folds, closing postures and don’t forget to end with savasana – otherwise known as corpse pose – to relax. Keep in mind: you want variety.

2. Pick a pose that you can build towards, such as a Side Plank, Upward-facing Bow Pose, or any other you consider a challenge for your students. It is a fun way to sequence your class and you can show your students how to get there and help them out in order for them to feel a degree of success or a “peak” in the class.. Collective challenges can be a good motivation with the right group of students.

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3. You can also pick a particular area of the body you want to focus on and plan your class around. Whether it’s the shoulders, hips or abdomen, it is something your students will enjoy and they will leave feeling the difference in each of those areas.

4. Pick one or two key points you want to drive home each class. They will help you determine the poses you want to use and will give your classes a takeaway that students will appreciate.

5. Choose a theme to sequence your class around. For example, you can choose gratitude, focusing on gentle lifts of the chest and expansion of the torso, simulating heart-opening. You can make your theme one that refers to your students’ strengths, and make them do all kinds of challenging poses. You can create challenges and plan deadlines with your students so they feel motivated to reach their goalsPick one or two key points you want to drive home each class. They will help you determine the poses you want to use and will give your classes a takeaway that students will appreciate.

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Keep these tips in mind. Do what feels best and be sure to take into account your students – find out what they want, talk to them – because they may have good ideas that will benefit the class.

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Ryan Rockwell (“The Yogi Marketer”) turned his passion for yoga and marketing into a career as one of the most sought after marketing strategists. His focus is representing individuals and companies who have a conscious voice. This includes marketing for Yoga Journal, National Geographic, Vegetarian Times, Backpacker, Climber, and True Nature Yoga. Ryan’s work has evolved into helping other yoga teachers share their gifts with the world.
Learn more about Ryan here.